2019: Why So Many Criminals Want To Rule Nigeria

Nigeria is yet at another crossroad and it is fundamental to state that those who contributed to the problems in Nigeria are never going to be a part of the solution. The solutions to Nigeria’s problems are a multifaceted approach

The hope that came with the APC change agenda in 2015 finally died. The greatest indicator to this fact is the record number of criminal politicians that want to rule Nigeria. In my understanding, to see a monumental failure as shown by the APC-Buhari mandate was a great inspiration to pretenders and cunning men now aspiring to the office of the president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

2019: Why So Many Criminals Want To Rule Nigeria

By Adeola Aderounmu

 

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From a near-past perspective, if Mr. Jonathan had succeeded, Buhari would never have become the president of Nigeria. His emergence was not as a result of the voting that took place in 2015. It was a grand takeover of Nigeria irrespective of the electoral process. Jonathan’s speech that his ambition was not worth the blood of any Nigerian summarized that submission beyond any doubt. It was a civilian coup that had the backing of all former military gangsters and a handful of notorious and corrupt civilian politicians in both APC and PDP.

In 2015 despite all the glaring evidence that the sponsors of Buhari were all corrupt politicians and individuals of questionable character, there was an air of expectation that maybe, just maybe the entrance of Buhari would be a mark of turning points and massive repentance. The change slogan was supposed to mean a deviation from the past and the evolution of truth, accountability and the re-emergence of a country where human dignity and credibility would be promoted. It was a grand deception.

Buhari who emerged despite his lack of qualification for the office has failed in all areas. There are some situations that are unforgivable because it turned out that Buhari is a great liar and a man who cannot stand by his words. He said he would end foreign travels for medical reasons but he championed the cause and still plans to continue to visit UK for treatment. His children are still attending schools abroad despite the pledge to end such.

Just before this article was published, we read and saw how Buhari’s wife had been involved in a multibillion naira scam through her ADC. These people have no shame and they are a disgrace to humanity.

In Buhari’s regime, corruption reached a new height and he appears not to be bothered. In the history of Nigeria, Buhari’s government will go down as the most tribalistic and nepotic. Buhari has no shame and he does not see anything wrong with the appointments he made and kept making.

In all these and much more came a glaring view of what Buhari stood for and how incompetent and unknowledgeable he is in public service and administration. Nigerians are suffering more today than ever. It may appear reasonable to conclude that what Nigerians are going through today is a summation of the effects of the misrule of both the PDP and APC.

However, I do not agree with the notion that it must get worse before it gets better. Things can stay the same as they were in 2015 before the APC government took over. The morning will always show the day. What the Buhari-APC mandate has been up to for the past 3 years will land Nigeria in doom if it is not checkmated as soon as possible. This regime, its characteristics and the outcomes will spell more doom for Nigeria.

It is possible to reprint the manifesto and the promises of APC. An impossible mission will be to match any of those promises or manifesto point with an outcome. This government is a waste of time and is not in any way different from the Jonathan administration in terms of value added to the people’s lives. One of the saddest memory that this regime will leave behind is the lack of implementation of the first point on it’s manifesto. Buhari is not interested in the idea of political and economic restructuring of Nigeria despite riding on the idea to power.

The record number of presidential aspirants in Nigeria today is a reflection of the grand failure of the Buhari administration. Buhari habours criminals and he protects them gallantly. He had been away for several months and cannot cope with the hassles and demands of his office. He is absent minded and extremely insensitive to the challenges that the people are facing. But the faults is not all his. Across Nigeria, governance is a huge joke. The bulk stops on Buhari’s table because he is not leading by any good example.

A quick review of the lists of presidential aspirants in both the APC and PDP shows that Nigeria is in for a recycling of criminals should Buhari or any of the aspirants from APC or PDP become the next president of Nigeria.

There is no single one of them that is not liable for the present predicament that Nigeria is in today. It is impossible to print on each of them. But look at Atiku and Saraki for a start. If you look at the alleged criminal charges on these two, you will be amazed what you find. They are hiding behind the slogan “innocent until proven guilty” knowing fully well that they suppressed and destroy the rule of law in Nigeria. These two men and their families would have been hung on the tree of shame for life in a sane country where the rule of law is supreme.

It is the same for several of the politicians in Nigeria today thriving on a useless political system propelled by extreme impunity that is catalyzed by another senseless concept called the immunity clause

Conclusively, Nigeria is yet at another crossroad and it is fundamental to state that those who contributed to the problems in Nigeria are never going to be a part of the solution. The solutions to Nigeria’s problems are a multifaceted approach.

The people must unite and make a collective decision to adopt a functional political system. What we practice today in Nigeria is a very useless political system that ridicules the intellectual capacity of the black race. We are shaming ourselves and Africa!

There is a need to bring governance back to the grassroots and enshrine it back in the regions. The politics of Abuja should be abolished and the National Assembly dismantled. It is draining money, energy and resources that could be used for important development process.

The people also need to make a collective decision about the fate of criminal politicians. The best way is to fight till death for the independence of the judiciary so that the law can apply equally for the poor and the rich. In the regions and in every aspect of life (politics, work and services) the concept of immunity clause should be erased for ever and ever.

A wise thing for the people of Nigeria to do in 2019 is to revolt and turn their backs to the APC and the PDP because the deflection of members of these political parties means that the two parties are the same and they are out to destroy Nigeria and Nigerians. It is pure evil the eyes can see.

Finally, it must be stressed that whatever happens to Nigeria, just like what had been happening since 1960, are the outcome of our collective actions and inactions. History will never be kind to those who did nothing to salvage this country from the precipice of ruins.

aderounmu@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CBCIU: for CULTURE? Or ‘PENKELEMES’?

By Wole Soyinka

TEXT of Professor WOLE SOYINKA’S ADDRESS to the NIGERIAN MEDIA on the  “CENTRE FOR BLACK CULTURE AND INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING,” Oshogbo, on September 1, 2015 at Freedom Park, Broad Street, LAGOS.

CBCIU: for CULTURE?  Or  ‘PENKELEMES’?

Gentlemen of the Press,

One way to summarize the situation of the Centre for Black Culture and International Understanding (CBCIU) at this moment requires no deep elaboration. It goes thus: There is Law, and there is Ethics. Wherever these two arbiters of public conduct appear to clash, even Ethics must bow to Law.  On the other hand, it is useful to remember also that the sinews that bind civilized society together are strengthened when both – Law and  Ethics – converge, and are harmonized in a public cause.

To come down to the specifics of the Centre for Black Culture and International Understanding, I require no convincing that this ideal harmonization was manifested when the lawmakers of Osun State enacted, in 2012, an amendment to the original CBCIU law that had been signed into law by Governor Oyinlola on 29th December 2008. That origjnal law, in my view, was profoundly unethical.  The Amendment, by the succeeding House of Assembly, signed into law on the 31st day of July, 2012, was clearly designed to inject an ethical corrective into the original law.

I am not qualified to comment on the legal intricacies of the provisions in either, if any – this must be left to “our learned friends” of the legal profession. They have however advised that the July 2012 amendment supersedes the original, and that this Amendment constitutes the current law within under which the CBCIU obtains its validity, until overturned under a new Law enacted by a chamber of equal or superior jurisdiction. For direct public enlightenment, the heading of the Document of Assent goes thus:

STATE OF OSUN, NIGERIA

OSUN STATE CENTRE FOR BLACK CULTURE AND

INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING

(AMENDMENT) LAW, 2012

Assented to by the Governor of Osun State on the 31st of July 2012

No court judgment exists that voids a single provision of this law – including the setting up of a new board – or its entirety.

It is important that this nation, and the entire world of culture and ethical pursuit understand this. Contrary to whatever has been propagated so assiduously by some parties of interest in various quarters, NO court order exists that prevents the Board that was established under the 2012 Amendment from exercising its rights and responsibilities. NO court order exists that compels the Governor or House of Assembly to reinstate the former Board Chairman of 2008.

NO relief has been granted to the ex-governor Olagunsoye Oyinlola, that authorizes him to present himself to the nation and the world as the substantive chairman of the CBCIU (or ‘Emeritus Chairman’ – among other titles that he has since accorded himself.) This is the legal position – as the Board remains advised by Osun State government’s legal department.

If these experts are proven wrong, then the current board will bow out without one second’s delay, led by its current chairman. It will most gladly hand over all CBCIU effects in its possession and even tender a public apology to the ex-governor, his ‘Board Members’, his campaign team and indeed any other interested parties.

From the corporate, we move to the individual. Here, I wish to outline the  section of the Amendment by the Osun House of Assembly that remains of primary interest to me, personally. It is that portion which articulates, in accessible language, that much desired convergence of Law and Ethics which, as earlier proposed, offers society a basis for civilized existence. I quote:

“Section 8 of the Principal Law is hereby amended by substituting

thereof the following provisions:

(a) The Board shall consist of the following members:

(i)  The Chairman of the Board who shall be the Governor or anyone appointed by him for this purpose…..

For emphasis, I call attention to that section again which states: “who shall be the governor….

In contrast, the parallel provision in the original, now ineffectual law, signed by Prince Oyinlola, states –  “who shall be Prince Olagunsoye Oyinlola”.  Oyinlola to Oyinlola, and Oyinlola for ever and ever – Oyinlola!

What the Amendment legislates is that the CBCIU is public property, established and maintained with state funds, funded by the state, housed by the state, instituted by elected representatives of the people. It is not private, hereditary property, not even of the most elevated royalty.

To my ears, this is ethical music.

It should be of interest to reveal that I had a private meeting on this issue with the Director-General of UNESCO, Madam Irina Bokova, when she and I attended an event nearly exactly two years ago in Kazakhstan. I had learnt, not too surprisingly, that the former governor of Osun State, Prince Oyinlola, had made forays into UNESCO headquarters, Paris, to protest his removal from a position he had created for himself while governor – and in perpetuity.  Invited to that meeting, once I raised the issue, was Hans d’Orville, one of Madame Bokova’s most senior aides. I asked her how UNESCO proposed to handle what was gearing up to become quite a penkelemes  (courtesy Adelabu) for all parties in this unseemly development.

Hans d’Orville confirmed that the Prince had indeed written protest letters to UNESCO and also shown up a number of times in his own person, sometimes with a delegation.  Hans d’Orville informed his Director-General and I that he had already responded to Oyinlola’s written appeals, and that, on each personal visit, he repeated exactly what he had written to the prince, namely, that CBCIU was set up under the laws of the host country – that is, of Osun State, Nigeria – thus, UNESCO could not interfere in a situation that would contradict the provisions of such laws.

UNESCO’s Director-General nodded in agreement, saying: “That is exactly my understanding.”

Then she, in turn, wanted to know what was the real story behind the development. I warned her that the issue had a very long history. We were all rather pressed for time, needed to catch flights in different directions. So I proposed that, instead of rehashing the tortuous details, I would pose a hypothetical question to her. I said:

“Let me ask you a simple question. If you decided to leave UNESCO tomorrow, would you use UNESCO funds to set up an entity, any kind of institution, use your position to channel an annual disbursement from UNESCO’s coffers, receive and dispense funds, and make yourself, in your personal capacity, head of that organization – and for life?”

She recoiled in horror. “No-o! That would be highly unethical. Such a thing is not possible”.

I added: “That about sums it up. The incoming governor of Osun State took exactly such a position, embarked on steps to dissolve the board and constitute a new one. The erstwhile, self-appointed Life Chairman has gone to court to contest that position. My advice is that you keep UNESCO away from the ensuing splatter while we clean up our own mess internally – we are quite used to it.”

That was in September 2013. As a member of UNESCO’s High Panel for Peace, I have interacted with Madame Bokova at a number of events since then, as well as with Hans d’Orville before his departure from UNESCO. I was made aware – from numerous sources – that Oyinlola, aided by the  former Nigerian representative to UNESCO, Dr. Omolewa, continued to wear out carpets leading to the Africa desk, to numerous offices and national delegations to UNESCO.

However, I studiously refrained from raising my concerns with the Director-General or indeed any other serving UNESCO official, right up to this press conference – which shall be copied to UNESCO.  Moreover, the Prince continued to make overtures to Governor Arigbesola, and myself, and to leaders in his new political party, pleading that they intervene so that he could be reinstated on the board in any capacity, however subordinate.

I left that plea to the governor entirely – since it remains his prerogative. I did assure him however that I would not stand in the way. I shall reveal here that I went even further – albeit against the grain – but in order to save the nation from international embarrassment through an obsession that I could not yet fully understand – I accommodated Mr. Oyinlola so far as to propose to the governor a Special Board Membership, tasked with responsibility for traditional royal cultures.

Simultaneously however, as was certainly within his fundamental rights, Mr. Oyinlola pursued his legal challenges, having first made off, even till today, with all the files – including every scrap of financial records – of the Centre. While the courts tried to address the conundrum of a life appointee being dispossessed while still very much alive, Mr. Oyinlola chose to pre-empt the courts’ decision. Aided, and even physically accompanied by Nigeria’s former representative to UNESCO, Dr. Omolewa, who was familiar with the interstices of that institution, Oyinlola commenced a campaign, both internally and externally, to disseminate a fraudulent version of the court proceeding. The prince has claimed – and still does! – that the courts had indeed found for him, and that he is back in office as chairman of CBCIU.

Our legal advice is that no basis for such a claim exists! What we do know – and this is clear from the actual court records, not the disseminated, bowdlerized versions, even for the “unlearned” – is that the Court has not even touched the substance of Prince Oyinlola’s appeal for reinstatement!  The only effective law, we are firmly advised, remains the July 2012 Law enacted by Osun State House of Assembly.

That leaves us – at least for now – with what primarily interests me, as a citizen dedicated, not only to the Rule of Law – but to the ethics of governance.  Without incurring the wrath of the courts for “contempt”, I believe we are entitled to indulge in a transformative debate on the ethics that underlie the provisions of both laws, taken together and in contrast.  That debate, the genesis of much of a continent’s post-colonial woes of devastating dimensions, is sometimes described as the “sit-tight syndrome”. It consists of the corrupt privatization of  public entities – including nations – with all their assets, even the intangibles! My ever growing conviction that this is a long overdue discourse, limitless in scope and ramifications, to be pursued as a continent-wide undertaking

My immediate contribution to that debate shall be phrased along the same terms as I addressed Madame Bokova in Kazakhstan, only, this time, it is addressed to this nation’s president, General Buhari, who has unusually elevated the anti-corruption struggle to the very top of his governance agenda. I must warn General Buhari – in the absence of a Foreign Minister – that, as a consequence of activities of this “CBCIU” double, the nation is being dragged into a sleazy situation through the attempted co-option of its foreign missions into logistical support for their global enterprises.

And so to the question:  “When you leave office, General Buhari, will you also carve out a privatized entity  – cultural, educational, political, religious, socio-economic, perhaps even a military unit or whatever – for yourself from public funds, provide it an annuity from the nation’s treasury, empower it to receive funds from internal and external sources, and make yourself, in your own individual person – that is, as Muhammadu Buhari – its Executive Chairman, and for life?”

Wole SOYINKA

Chairman, Centre for Black Culture and International Understanding (CBCIU)

Oshogbo, Osun State, NIGERIA.

 

DISTRIBUTION LIST:

Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola, Governor, Osun State

Director-General, UNESCO, Paris

CHAIRMAN, Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission

Chairman, The Presidential Advisory Commission on Corruption

The Nigerian Ambassador to Brazil.

The Brazilian Ambassador to Nigeria, Abuja

IPEAFRO, Brazil

The Director, Iwalewa-Haus, Bayreuth University, Germany